facebook_pixel

Accidentally finding a useful new scoring system

Last week I ran a small training session what ended up being a trio of players from the Devon team that won South West Championships this year and a quartet of junior aged girls. The skill levels are obviously quite widely separated in a situation like that, so there are limits to what you can do in terms of drills.

We did some fundamental work on ball-handing and serving and passing, then moved into game play. Then I moved it to game play and had the Devon players go against the four girls, playing on half a court to encourage rallies.

Obviously, we’re talking about teams which were quite imbalanced. In order to make things more competitive, I introduced a scoring twist. The young team used standard rally scoring, but the Devon team could only score on kills. Aside from keeping the game more competitive, there were some interesting side effects to using this system.

  1. Devon quickly started serving easily because they could only score if the ball came back over the net, allowing them to run a transition attack.
  2. Devon also started hitting the ball harder and attacked the ball from positions they perhaps would not have done so otherwise.
  3. The girls realized quickly that they needed to adapt their defense to deal with more aggressive play, which got them putting up a much more effective block to slow the Devon attack down.
  4. The girls were also freed up to play more aggressively than they otherwise would because they couldn’t lose points for making errors.

The girls ended up winning 25-23. One of the Devon players and I were commenting afterward that the 23 kills they got in that game were more than many teams get in multiple games (even matches at certain levels).

I didn’t have all the side effects in mind when I decided to do that split scoring game. I was just looking for a way to even things out a bit (we later mixed the groups for a regular game). As I watched the play, though, I could see what was developing and it definitely gave me ideas for how I could use it in other training session, with Devon or other teams, in the future.

In particular, one of the issues we had with the Exeter Uni women’s team was putting the ball away. We played very good defense, which let us compete with even the top teams, but just couldn’t get the kills we needed. Using this kind of scoring system for scrimmage play in practice could be effective in working on more aggressive attacking since there are no consequences for making hitting errors.

John Forman
About the Author: John Forman
John currently coaches for an NCAA Division II women's team. This follows a stint as head coach for a women's professional team in Sweden. Prior to that he was the head coach for the University of Exeter Volleyball Club BUCS teams (roughly the UK version of the NCAA) while working toward a PhD. He previously coached in Division I of NCAA Women's Volleyball in the US, with additional experience at the Juniors club level, both coaching and managing, among numerous other volleyball adventures. Learn more on his bio page.

Please share your own ideas and opinions.