Tag Archive for Training Plan

Parkinson’s Law definitely applies to practice planning!

Once, as I developed the training plans for the Svedala team, I recalled Parkinson’s Law. It goes something like this.

Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.

I’ve written before about the amount of time you should allocate to practice planning. Part of that discussion was how easily the task could consume crazy amounts of time if not properly constrained. I experienced that while coaching at Exeter. I could find find myself spending all afternoon making up that evenings practice plan. Then, I had to remind myself of that a couple of times the first week of training in Sweden.

It was so tempting for me as I got started with a new team in a new environment to let the practice planning suck me in and not let me go.

You may be thinking, “But you were a professional volleyball coach. That was your job!”

That’s true, but that doesn’t mean I should let one task eat of a major part of my day. Efficiency in planning is just as important as developing an efficient training plan. There are a lot of other things for a coach to do. Watching video comes immediately to mind!

Training Plan: 11 players, just games

Priorities: Shake off the rust with lots of touches, start the process of the players getting to know each other at the beginning of a new season, get some initial impressions

Training time: 2 hours

Space: 2 courts

Players: 11 (2 setters)

Notes: Because set-up and take down were included in the allocated time, and some amount of time was necessarily allocated to introductions and initial discussion, the actual training period was somewhat less than 2 hours.

– – – The Plan – – –

Warm-up: No isolated warm-up.

Cooperative 1 vs 1 and 1 vs 1 w/fixed setter: Set up 4 games on 1 v. 1 and one game of 1 v 1 with a fixed setter. The idea is to get to 6 good pass-set-downball sequences. As soon as one group gets there, they all rotate in a clockwise fashion. If no one gets there in the time limit, rotate anyway.
11-player singles rotation3-person and 4-person pepper w/fixed setter: On one court is two groups of 3-person rotating over-the-net pepper. On the other court is a 2 v. 2 pepper with a fixed setter. The team’s two setters are market A and B. Again, play to six good pass-set-hit sequences (this time with jumping), or a the time limit. Rotation for the non-setters is clockwise. The setters switch positions each rotation.

11-player peppers

5-person and 6-person player winners: Each court has a game of Player Winners on it, one with 5 players and one with 6 players. Play for 5 minutes, then move the top 2 from the 5-person court to the 6-person, and the bottom 3 from the 6-person court the other way (now making the 5 a 6 and the 6 a 5). Play 5 more minutes, then send the top 3 from the 6-person court to the 5-person court, and the bottom 2 from the 5-person court to the 6-person court. Play another 5 minutes, then repeat the process from after the first round. Play one last round of 5 minutes.

Winners 3: Finish with standard Winners (3s in this case) Start with back court attacks only, then shift to allowing front court attacks as well.

– – – Observations – – –

The first two exercises went quicker than expected. As a result it was desirable to add a 5th exercise. The initial thought was to play Winners 4s, but instead Neville Pepper was used. The 9 non-setters were split up into three roughly equal teams. They were the teams to play through the games. The setters were used in a fixed fashion, switching sides when the challenge side won a rally.

Coaching Log – Aug 28, 2015

This is an entry in my volleyball coaching log for 2015-16.

The first training session is on Monday!

I’ll return to Svedala this weekend. Aside from getting my domestic affairs sorted out, my first priority before Monday evening’s initial practice is meeting with the three American players. I will have a first full team meeting before Tuesday’s training session, but I want to talk about a few things with Camryn, Chelsey, and Mo that relate specifically to them and their status as the foreign players in the squad.

Right now I’m planning to do a playing-only session on Monday, which is a 2 hour slot at our secondary facility. Tuesday we’ll have a team meeting before we do the first proper training session in the main hall. I’ve asked that any “just training” or “want to try it out before making a decision” players be at the Tuesday session at a minimum, and Monday too if at all possible. My main meeting focus on Tuesday will be what I expect to see in training (behavior, attitude, etc.) and what the players can expect from me. I want “guest” players to know what my expectations are going in because they will be held to the same standards as everyone else.

Wednesday we have our first session of weight training as a team before practice. I’ll probably focus that on assessment with regards to a couple key exercises. I need to find out what the exercise club we’ll be using has for equipment, etc. Thursday is an off day. Friday night and Saturday morning will be regular training sessions of 3 hours and 2 hours respectively, though I doubt I’ll go the full time on Friday.

My main point of emphasis for the whole first week will be on seeing where the team and individuals are at in terms of both play and fitness so I can then start plotting our developmental path forward.

Schedule:
I found out this week that the revised schedule has been set following the late withdrawal of a team I mentioned previously. The plan is similar to the previous schedule where we were to play most teams home and away, but two teams close to us geographically another home and away round. Only in this case it will be three teams we play 4 times each rather than two, with Hylte/Halmstad added to Engelholm and Gislaved. The playoff structure was still being decided at last check.

The schedule for the pre-season tournament we’re playing in Denmark the last weekend of September has been released. It’s an 8-team tournament featuring a pair of 4-team pools. Pool A is Holte, Brøndby, Hylte/Halmstad, and Fortuna. Pool B is Engelholm, Svedala, Team Køge, Amager. So we’ll get to see the three Danish teams we have as competition in the Öresundsligan I mentioned before. Engelholm is also part of that league. Fortuna and Team Køge are both also from the Danish top division.

The third Swedish team in the Öresundsligan is Gislaved. It looks like we’ll play them the weekend before the above tournament as a 1-off friendly. Unfortunately, the timing of that is a bit awkward, as two of my players have been called up to the Sweden U19 camp next month in preparation for the NEVZA U19 tournament in October. Both have played for Sweden at the U17 level. One of those players is a middle, of which I currently only have two in the squad. Could make things a bit tricky in terms of line-up decisions.

From this point on I expect to shift the timing of these log entries. I won’t do them daily the way I did with Exeter in 2013-14 and 2014-15. This is mainly a function of having training or matches 5 days a week for the most part. That would just be too many entries and wouldn’t leave much room to write about anything else. I might do some daily entries in the case of very specific items of broad interest, but beyond that I’ll probably stick to a weekly publishing calendar and maybe post on Sunday or Monday.

Small squad volleyball training

I saw the following question posed by a volleyball coach. Most of us at some point in our coaching careers have to deal either with having a small squad or having limited numbers in training, so I thought it worth addressing.

I have 6-7 players, how can i create game like situation without enough to scrimmage each other? Our first game is coming soon so I’m really needing this week to get them set up in their positions, learn where they need to go….etc. But hard without having another team to play the ball back over….

I can relate. Once, in my first year coaching U16 girls it was just me and 6 players in training. I decided to play a little game with them at the end of the session. It was me against them. I served every ball and if I could dig their attack with control, or they could not return the ball, I got the point. If they could get a kill, they got the point.

Funnily, after I developed a solid lead mainly by digging their attacks (experience in reading an attacker has its advantages!), one of the girls said in exasperation, “Can we please stop hitting the ball right to John!?” 🙂

I liked hearing that. At least one of them was looking for the team to try to problem solve so they could beat me! I’m pretty sure I still won the game relatively comfortably, but they did get more competitive.

I tell this story as an example of how a little thought and creativity can lead to useful solutions. I’ve seen plenty of examples of a smaller number of players taking on a full squad. It’s just a question of finding rules and/or a scoring system. You want a system that makes things appropriately competitive. And it should see the players focused on whatever the keys are for that particular exercise.

It’s also worth looking at ways you can train game situations with elements of the team. A 3-v-3 game back row game is useful to work on defense against back row attacks and down balls. A game where you have an OH attacking into Zones 1 or 6 going against an OPP attacking into Zones 6 or 5 can be a highly game-like activity using a limited number of players. The same for having OHs going against each other with cross court attacks.

A serve reception example of this could be to put two passers in to cover 2/3rds of the court (say Zones 1 and 6) and having a setter and hitting element incorporated. If you set it up so it matches a serve receive rotational situation (such a setter penetrating from 1 with the MB in 3), then you can work quite nicely on key aspects of that phase of play without needing 6 players on one side.

With activities like that, it’s about taking what’s going on in a certain part of the court. You basically exclude the positions which wouldn’t be involved the the game scenario you’re training. That frees players up for something else to facilitate the exercise.

It’s about more than just the coaching

Observing other coaches isn’t just about see what they do on the court.

It’s more than just watching the kind of drills and games they run. It’s more than seeing how they structure their training sessions.

Granted, it’s fine to want to look at those things, especially if you are a developing coach. They provide ideas you can evaluate for use in your own coaching. Even experienced coaches can take something away from doing that sort of thing.

If all you’re doing is making notes of the practice plan and the activities it encompasses, though, you’re missing so much other stuff. Here’s just some of the additional things you can watch during a training session:

  • How the coach interacts with the players during the down times
  • How the coach communicates during the activities
  • Where the coach stands and how they move around
  • Positioning and involvement of the assistant coach(es)
  • How the coaching staff interacts among themselves
  • The composition of the player group
  • The general environment of the session
  • The tone and energy of the players and the training

With a bit of thought about your own team’s training environment and processes you could probably think of a few other things someone from the outside could potentially observe.

Aside from being additional sources of insight, inspiration, education, and the like, taking all these other things in provides context to what we’re seeing in terms of what the coach has the players doing. No two teams operate the same way. A lot of that has to do with the combination of personalities (player and coach) and the environment which are involved. You must consider the context in which something is being done, especially by an experienced and successful coach. If you don’t, you are likely to misapply what you’re seeing in your own efforts. Check out this Volleyball Coaching Wizards Podcast episode for more on that subject.

Also consider another layer of what you can potentially take away from spending time with other coaches. Here I’m talking about the more day-to-day sort of stuff they do to manage their teams. What do they do off the court? How do they interact with management or administrators? What is their recruiting process?

These aren’t the sort of things you are likely to see just going to watch some training sessions. You need to spend time with other coaches away from the gym. When I took over a professional team for the first time at Svedala, as much as the on-court stuff was interesting, the off-the-court area was where I felt I had more pressing developmental need.

That’s a big part of why I decided to return to Germany that August before getting things started in Sweden. I could talk with the coaches, and even members of the management team, about a wide array of non-training things in the context of what they were doing with the team, and generally see how they operate.

The point is, while it’s definitely a good idea to get out there and watch other coaches in action and interact with them, it’s important to use the experience to go beyond the Xs and Os and to take a deeper look at things.

Volleyball coaching a distraction

Does this sound like you during the volleyball season?

Am I the only one that can’t get any work done during the day because I continually get distracted by thoughts of today’s drill schedule?

I know I certainly struggled keeping my focus on things that were supposed to have my attention (work, studies, etc.) at various points and times. While I coached at Exeter my days were frequently sidetracked by volleyball issues. That was true even when I wasn’t coaching that evening. I remember in my early days of coaching college volleyball spending time developing practice plans while at my day job.

Needless to say, for the sake of our employment, grades, relationships, or whatever, this is probably not something we should be in the habit of allowing to happen. 🙂

Here’s a possible way to tackle this issue. Set aside some specific time during the day when you permit yourself the volleyball distraction. I suspect it’s not a good idea to just cut it out cold turkey.

On a related subject, I realized planning practice takes basically all the time I allow myself to do it. By that I mean if I start working on it 2 hours before training it takes 2 hours. If I give it 30 minutes it takes 30 minutes. To address this situation I don’t start putting together the actual training plan until a certain time each day.

That isn’t to say I don’t think about what I wanted to accomplish that session beforehand. That process begins pretty much as soon as my last contact with the team ended. It’s just that I am more efficient writing up the actual plan itself.

Early season practice planning

Practice planning is – or at least should be – a major part of any coach’s efforts. Generally speaking, the wisdom goes that you should probably spend about as much time developing a training plan as executing it. That said, the question still remains what elements you should include. This is the subject of a question I saw posted the other day, in particular with respect to early season plans.

How do you generate an effective practice plan? I struggle in the beginning of the season when I see new faces, different levels of talent, a need to work on fundamental basics for some girls but not others, pressure to throw a lineup together for an active preseason, and it’s just me.

The approach I generally take with a team at the start of the season is to first try to evaluate where we’re at in all the major facets of the game. By that I mean I want to get an idea of where both individual players singularly and the team collectively are relatively to where I think they need to be. Having that information lets me develop my training priorities – both short and long term.

That being the case, I like to develop initial session practice plans which incorporate a bit of everything – serving accuracy and consistency, serve reception, offense, and defense. Of course I try to do that in as game-like a fashion as possible, but I don’t mind stepping back from that if there’s something I feel like I need to look at more directly. You need to see enough repetition for each player to have a sufficient basis for analysis, which may require more of a “block” than “random” focus in some respects.

The key thing to keep in mind here is that the top priority is assessment. Training is a secondary priority, of course, but for these initial sessions it’s not the most important thing to be thinking about. Once I’m done with the assessment process, training takes over as top priority.

Let me offer an example.

In a couple weeks I’ll start training with Svedala. It will be my first time working with these players and in almost all cases the first I see them on-court in person. Before I can figure out what to prioritize for training I need to know where the players and the team is at from a number of different perspectives. My plan is to have them spend the first practice basically just playing a number of different games to get a general overview. Then, in the subsequent sessions, I’ll narrow the focus down to look at certain things more closely based on what I saw in that first session.

Having said all this, chances are there are certain things that you know you’re going to need to work on in training. For younger and developing players, serving and passing are usually right at the top of the list, as an example. You can easily incorporate training of the things you know will be priorities right from the start, and build in opportunities to assess other areas around that.

Beach training for indoor?

As I mentioned yesterday, I’m visiting TV Bühl for the next couple of weeks. The team just started training on Monday. Unfortunately, the club doesn’t have a gym available for the early part of pre-season. It’s a function of the community facility situation vis-a-vis school break.

So what do you do?

In the case, the coaches are making use of some local sand courts. What they did was take some circuits they would have done indoors and do them in the sand. The first circuit included core exercises, shoulder stability, and lower body work. The second circuit focused on volleyball movements. The first comprised 10 stations, while the second had 5 (2 players per station in that case), and they did both twice through. Imagine how much harder doing that sort of stuff is when you have to deal with sand as the platform for pushing off, changing direction, etc.

After that the guys played a 4 v 4 game. As you might expect, that was a bit more fun and serious.

The team begins weight room training this morning, with more sand stuff for evening training. The hope is that we’ll be able to be in the gym by the latter part of the week.

Player-run small-group training session

I watched some of the Svedala area players do a little bit of a training session one evening during July 2015 before I took over the team. It was something they organized and ran among themselves. There were two players from the Elite team, with three from the lower and youth teams. While watching, I found myself thinking it provided something of a template for a small group training situation, so I figured I’d share the basic outline.

They didn’t do any kind of formal warm-up. Instead, they basically played themselves warm through a progression. That started with a 1-touch game played inside the 3m line with the 2 Elite players against the 3 others. They started with forearm passing only, then shifted to overhead passing only.

From there they moved to a 2-ball, 2-person tennis type of game. Basically, each team served the ball underhand simultaneously. From there they played 1-touch until both balls were dead. Again, it was the Elite players against the 3 others, with the latter rotating a player in after each rally.

After that they moved to some serving and passing. One player served. One player was setter. There was a passer in 6 and a passer in 5, with one off as a sub. Each good pass resulted in a set to 4 attacked by the passer in 5. After each play, the players rotated with the 6 moving to 5, 5 coming out, and the remaining player coming in at 6. After a set number of reps, they switched servers.

Next up was a diagonal attacking and defense drill. They had a fixed setter setting both sides, then split the Elite players and partnered each with one of the younger players. Players were in positions 4 and 5. Each rally started with a free ball (initiated by a player’s mother, who coaches the U15s). Every set went to 4 and after the ball crossed the net the players switched positions. This was not a cooperative game. The hitters were swinging to score, but there were rallies.

That covered the first hour.

In the second hour they spent a bit of time working on 4-person defense with players in 1, 4, 5, and 6 with a player hitting from a stack of pads in 4 on the other side with periodic rotation. They did some more of the diagonal attacking and finished up with just some individual serving.

I feel like I’m forgetting something, but I think you get the idea. Maybe this gives you some thoughts for helping players in an open gym situations and the like.